The intensity of handshaking can tell about the risk of early death | Added: 20, August 2017



The analysis of the finger pressure force provides a more reliable and accurate method for predicting cardiovascular system diseases than an analysis of blood pressure levels.

Reducing handshake intensity by 5 kg increases the risk of early death by 16%.
Doctors can avaluate the risk of heart attack, stroke, or early death on the basis of a simple analysis of the strength of the handshake. This conclusion was reached by an international group of scientists who published the results of their research in the British medical journal Lancet.

Clinical observations of 140,000 patients in 14 countries indicate that doctors can process a simple and cheap method for avaluating the risk of cardiovascular disease, which can be more reliable than the analysis of blood pressure.

However, experts point out that the connection between the power of handshaking and the state of the cardiovascular system remains unclear and needs further study.
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It is well known that the pressure force of the fingers decreases with age.
"We still need to find out whether muscle building exercises can reduce the risk of early death or cardiovascular disease," says a project participant, Darryl Leong from McGill University in Canada.

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The results of the study published in Lancet show that the risk of the occurrence of the most common cardiovascular diseases increases when the handshaking intensity becomes weaker.

Women at their 25 have a pressure force of about 34 kg, and by the age of 70, it falls down by 25%.

While men at the same age have pressure of about 54 kg and 37 kg accordingly.
Studies conducted by an international team of physicians in 14 countries show that a reduction in the strength of the handshake by 5 kg leads to an increase in the risk of early death by 16%.

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At the same time, the risk of death from heart attack increases by 17%, while heart stroke by 9%.
Currently, doctors evaluate the risk of such diseases by filling out questionnaires, which includes points about age, smoking, weight, cholesterol level, blood pressure, place of residence and the history of family diseases.

Researchers state that the analysis of the finger pressure force provides a more reliable and accurate method for predicting diseases of the cardiovascular system rather than an analysis of blood pressure levels.

It remains unclear why the heart deterioration leads to a decrease in the strength of the handshake. Some physicians believe that a decrease in the elasticity of the arteries can cause a weakening of the pressure force in the finger muscles.